Review: T2 Trainspotting

Alex Berg March 25, 2017 Choose life. Choose a movie. Choose a sequel. Choose an inexplicable Terminator reference for a title. Choose a mid-life crisis. Choose nostalgia. Choose a half-baked screenplay. Choose style over substance. Choose garish cinematography. Choose terrible remixes of iconic songs. Choose imposing plot on a story that does not require one. Choose tonal inconsistency. Choose wasting a good cast. Choose two … Continue reading Review: T2 Trainspotting

Gorillaz’s Hallelujah Money, Weaponized Creativity

Nathan Le Master January 23, 2017 In ancient Athens, it was the during the tyrannical Rule of Thirty after the Peloponnesian War, from which came the cultural critic, Socrates. In China, it was against the backdrop of The Warring States Period, where civil collapse goaded thinkers into formulating different ways to structure our lives, of which Confucianism, Legalism, and Taoism, were three amongst many. And more recently, it was the Nixon presidency … Continue reading Gorillaz’s Hallelujah Money, Weaponized Creativity

Gjon Mili and the Mannequin Challenge: The Amusement of Capturing Lightning in a Bottle

Nathan Le Master December 31, 2016 “Time could truly be made to stand still. Texture could be retained despite sudden violent movement.” -Gjon Mili When thinking about the earliest photographs in the history of photography, you probably conjure up images of daguerreotypes of stuffily dressed men and women wearing Victorian scowls. Or those B&W pictures of fifteen people lined up, where one face is blurred because … Continue reading Gjon Mili and the Mannequin Challenge: The Amusement of Capturing Lightning in a Bottle

A Hunger Artist, Starving for Art’s Sake

Nathan Le Master October 4, 2016 Adapt or risk marginalization; this is the main premise to Franz Kafka’s A Hunger Artist. Taking the starving artist trope literally, it is a sad story about an individual’s dying art of self inflicted starvation, and the consequences of remaining stubbornly fixed to your craft. The artist initially brings out massive crowds of onlookers of all ages. He is … Continue reading A Hunger Artist, Starving for Art’s Sake

Lars and the Real Girl: The Role of Unreal Girls in Cinema

Deviating a bit from his role as suave, blue-collar Southernern, Noah Calhoun, in the The Notebook, Ryan Gosling strips off his masculine confidence to play agoraphobic Lars in one of his lesser known works, Craig Gillespie’s 2007 film, Lars and The Real Girl. Situated in a rural Midwestern town, Lars lives in sad mediocrity, working a nameless white collar job, and living in the garage … Continue reading Lars and the Real Girl: The Role of Unreal Girls in Cinema

Son of Saul: Defending Irrationality

Nathan Le Master May 21, 2016 Until I saw László Nemes’ Oscar winner, Son of Saul, my favorite Holocaust films were Schindler’s List and Life is Beautiful. In the characters of Oskar Schindler and the fictional Guido, we’re given stories that are tragically sentimental, bearing testimony to the beauty of resistance against an absolutely evil oppressor. Turning on Son of Saul, I anticipated a similar … Continue reading Son of Saul: Defending Irrationality

Ham on Rye: What Catcher in the Rye Could Never Be

Why do we read J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye? So we don’t feel so alone. So we’re reminded that others share the same struggle growing up. At least that’s how it’s presented in English Lit. But more importantly, we read Catcher in the Rye because Holden Caulfield is sexy. He’s intelligent, sharp, aloof, witty, always a little tipsy, always a little flirtatious, and always … Continue reading Ham on Rye: What Catcher in the Rye Could Never Be